Intentions

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5
Category: Philosophy
Author: Oscar Wilde
A study in green. It has constantly been made a subject of reproach against artists and men of letters that they are lacking in wholeness and completeness of nature. As a rule this must necessarily be so. That very concentration of vision and intensity of purpose which is the characteristic of the artistic temperament is in itself a mode of limitation. To those who are preoccupied with the beauty of form nothing else seems of much importance. Yet there are many exceptions to this rule. Rubens served as ambassador, and Goethe as state councillor, and Milton as Latin secretary to ...
Category: Philosophy
Author: Oscar Wilde
With some remarks upon the importance of doing nothing. A DIALOGUE . Part I. Persons : Gilbert and Ernest . Scene : the library of a house in Piccadilly , overlooking the Green Park Gilbert ( at the Piano ). My dear Ernest, what are you laughing at? Ernest ( looking up ). At a capital story that I have just come across in this volume of Reminiscences that I have found on your table. Gilbert . What is the book? Ah! I see. I have not read it yet. Is it good? Ernest . Well, while you have been ...
Category: Philosophy
Author: Oscar Wilde
With some remarks on the importance of discussing everything. A DIALOGUE : Part II. Persons : the same . Scene : the same . Ernest . The ortolans were delightful, and the Chambertin perfect, and now let us return to the point at issue. Gilbert . Ah! don’t let us do that. Conversation should touch everything, but should concentrate itself on nothing. Let us talk about Moral Indignation , its Cause and Cure , a subject on which I think of writing: or about The Survival of Thersites , as shown by the English comic papers; or about any topic ...
Category: Philosophy
Author: Oscar Wilde
An observation A DIALOGUE . Persons : Cyril and Vivian . Scene : the Library of a country house in Nottinghamshire . Cyril ( coming in through the open window from the terrace ). My dear Vivian, don’t coop yourself up all day in the library. It is a perfectly lovely afternoon. The air is exquisite. There is a mist upon the woods, like the purple bloom upon a plum. Let us go and lie on the grass and smoke cigarettes and enjoy Nature. Vivian. Enjoy Nature! I am glad to say that I have entirely lost that faculty. People ...
Category: Philosophy
Author: Oscar Wilde
A note on illusion. In many of the somewhat violent attacks that have recently been made on that splendour of mounting which now characterises our Shakespearian revivals in England, it seems to have been tacitly assumed by the critics that Shakespeare himself was more or less indifferent to the costumes of his actors, and that, could he see Mrs. Langtry’s production of Antony and Cleopatra , he would probably say that the play, and the play only, is the thing, and that everything else is leather and prunella. While, as regards any historical accuracy in dress, Lord Lytton, in an ...